Decoy Spreads for Goldeneyes

decoy spreads for goldeneyes

Here are 2 decoy spreads for goldeneyes you can try on your next goldeneye duck hunt.   If you want to pull in those beautiful goldeneyes, then these decoy spreads for goldeneyes are exactly what you need because each of the decoy spreads for goldeneyes are clearly illustrated so you can exactly replicate them to improve your chances for duck hunting success.  Now let’s take a look these 2 examples of decoy spreads for goldeneyes that you can give a try on your next duck hunting trip.

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Decoy Spreads for Goldeneyes #1

Decoy spreads for goldeneyes
Decoy spreads for goldeneyes

 

“Double Clutch” decoy spreads for goldeneyes Summary:

  • These are to go spreads for bluebills, but I will set them generally the same species wise
  • 8-10 dozen decoys consisting mainly of bluebills with a smattering of redheads, canvasbacks and buffleheads.
  • If present or timeline fits, goldeneye blocks (1-2dozen) can be added.
  • The “Shoreline U” is deal for the use of low profile layout seats in place of a standard blind.  I like low-profile states like this whenever the wind is from the rear as the birds are often coming straight at the hunters.
  • Mallard decoys are always added with both the U for confidence and drawing any northern flight mallards that are present or passing by.
  • The tails or strings should reach 100 yards or more out into the lake for greater visibility and a runway to the landing zone
  • A combination of gang lines for the tails, and individual rigged decoys for construction of the main bodies of the decoy spreads

 

The “Shoreline U” & “Double Clutch” decoy spreads have many similarities.  The main difference is I chose the U pattern when not hunting an obvious point, where shoreline is flat and straight with little variation.

 

The U can also be turned sidewise to hunting a crossing wind, arranging it so the shorter of the two tails is nearest shore.  This has a tendency to suck birds to the landing zone as desired.

 

The Double Clutch, because of its open on both ends is used when hunting on an obvious point, essentially splitting the near shore group of decoys into two.  This affords better visibility to a larger area of the lake.

 

It is not recommended the double clutch is turned sideways as divers will often land outside of the outer string because of a lack of body to draw them to a specific landing area.

 

In my experience, I avoid this spread for cross wind applications, but use it often when the wind is at our backs.

 

This decoy spread and commentary was provided by Jeff Taege at Hoduck Decoy Company.

 

Decoy Spreads for Goldeneyes #2

Decoy spreads for goldeneyes
Decoy spreads for goldeneyes

 

 “Shoreline U” Decoy Spreads for Goldeneyes:

  • These are to go spreads for bluebills, but I will set them generally the same species wise
  • 8-10 dozen decoys consisting mainly of bluebills with a smattering of redheads, canvasbacks and buffleheads.
  • If present or timeline fits, goldeneye blocks (1-2dozen) can be added.
  • The “Shoreline U” is deal for the use of low profile layout seats in place of a standard blind.  I like low-profile states like this whenever the wind is from the rear as the birds are often coming straight at the hunters.
  • Mallard decoys are always added with both the U for confidence and drawing any norther flight mallards that are present or passing by.
  • The tails or strings should reach 100 yards or more out into the lake for greater visibility and a runway to the landing zone
  • A combination of gang lines for the tails, and individual rigged decoys for construction of the main bodies of the decoy spreads

 

The “Shoreline U” & “Double Clutch” decoy spreads have many similarities.  The main difference is I chose the N pattern when not hunting an obvious point, where shoreline is flat and straight with little variation.

 

The U can also be turned sidewise to hunting a crossing wind, arranging it so the shoter of the two tails is nearest shore.  This has a tendency to suck birds to the landing zone as desired.

 

 

This decoy spread and commentary was provided by Jeff Taege at Hoduck Decoy Company.

 

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